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FILM STUDIES

QUALIFICATION

A Level

EXAM BOARD

WJEC Eduqas

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

A minimum of a grade 5 in English Language or English Literature. GCSE Film Studies or Media Studies is desirable.

SUBJECT TEACHERS

Mr A Lancashire

COURSE LEADER

Mr A Hart

WHY STUDY THIS COURSE?

Film studies reframes our understanding of film. Students will study the construction of a variety film texts and how meaning is produced through specific focus on cinematography, sound, editing, mise-en-scene and performance. For the exam component of the course students will compare both UK and US films in terms of the messages and values represented in the specific case studies. The coursework consists of a written analysis of a film, a production portfolio and an individual film production.

WHAT DOES THIS QUALIFICATION COVER?

The WJEC Eduqas specification is designed to introduce learners to a wide variety of films in order to broaden their knowledge and understanding of film. Learners will explore:

  • A diverse range of films
  • The significance of film and film practice in national, global and historical contexts
  • Film and its key contexts (including social, cultural, political, historical and technological contexts)
  • How films generate meanings and responses
  • Film as an aesthetic medium and the different ways in which spectators respond to film.
  • It also aims to enable learners to:
    • Apply critical approaches to film
    • Apply knowledge and understanding of film through either filmmaking or screenwriting

WHAT WILL I STUDY?

This specification offers opportunities to study mainstream and independent American and British films from the past and the present as well as more recent global films, both non-English language and English language. The study of silent film and significant film movements (such as new wave cinemas in Europe and Asia) allows learners to see the development of film from its early years to its still emerging digital future. Studies in documentary, experimental and short films are also on offer.

HOW WILL I BE ASSESSED?

Examination (70%)

The first exam is 2.5 hours / 35% of qualification

  • Hollywood 1930-1990 – comparative study of Vertigo (1958) and Blade Runner (1982)
  • American film since 2005 – two-film study of Carol (2015) and Captain Fantastic (2015)
  • British film since 1995 – two-film study of Secrets and Lies (1995) and We Need to Talk About Kevin (2011)

 

The second exam is 2.5 hours / 35% of qualification

  • Global film – two film study of Pan’s Labyrinth (2006) and House of Flying Daggers (2004)
  • Documentary film – study of The Arbor (2010)
  • Film movements: Silent Cinema – study of Spies (1928)
  • Film movements: Experimental film – study of Pulp Fiction (1994)

 

Practical Coursework (30%)

You can choose between creating a 5-minute short film, or writing a screenplay and producing a digital storyboard. You will then write a 1600-word reflective evaluation on your production or screenplay.

WHERE CAN IT LEAD?

Past students have progressed to film and media related courses at university, and then on to work within the industry, including the British Film Institute in London. Past students have set up their own production companies, and are successfully making a living using their film and media production skills.

Film Studies A-level is particularly relevant for University courses in film or media production, creative writing, advertising and marketing, journalism or teaching.

Students going directly into employment after A-Level Film Studies have skills suitable for PR, marketing, creative administration or roles requiring strong communication skills e.g. youth or charity work.